Good ol’ American Apple Pie

_MG_4851I know, I know – it’s a bit cliché for the American to make apple pie, but why not find out from this American food expert? I’m going to teach you how to make the most scrumptious apple pie delight. You’re really going to want to sink your teeth into this dessert.

But first, what’s the hype about apple pie? Back in the day, the medieval days, everything was baked in a pie. This means meat, veggies and just about anything else you can think of. With the only ovens being clay pots heated by burning flames, food was easily burnt to a crisp, and quick. The medieval cooks found that putting meat or anything else in a pastry crust kept food protected it from their fiery cooking pit. The pasty acted like a cooking dish. A pie crust wasn’t home to delicious fruits quite yet, but instead a protective source for anything edible.

So where does everyone get the idea that apple pie is an American creation? Blame it on the pilgrims. They would fill a pastry crust with the red delicious things hanging from the trees (apples) to fill the stomachs of hungry settlers. But these pies weren’t the flaky sugary goodness that we’re used to today. Most pie crusts were made from thick course flour making them tough and not too tasty to consume. I’d assume that’s why someone decided to toss in a bit of sugar for a tastier pie.

Now I have a confession to make. I’m so sorry bloggers, but I don’t enjoy an afternoon of sunshine, sweet tea and a warm piece of pie. The sunshine and tea hit the spot for me, but a slice of pie has never been a tasty treat that I enjoy. I’m more of a savoury treat type of girl. But when Brigid suggested we do some apple desserts, apple pie was a must for our American section. And after spending the hour slaving away on rolling out the pie crust, peeling and cutting apples and then shaping strips of pastry to make a fancy lattice top, I had to give my creation a taste. And half a pie later, I realised that I now understand why Americans call themselves pie lovers – I’ve converted folks. My taste buds have changed and I am proud to say I’m a pie lover. Follow these simple instructions to continue your obsession with these sugary treats or become a lover of pie,  just like I did!

_MG_4850_MG_4835Ingredients:

  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • One teaspoon cinnamon
  • Two tablespoons flour
  • A dash of salt
  • One egg
  • One tablespoon of water
  • Around six or seven apples – depending on how large of a baking dish you have
  • Pastry crust
  • Cooking spray
  1.  Preheat your oven to 425 degrees F or 220 degrees C.
  2.  Combine the sugar and cinnamon into a bowl. Be sure to save a sprinkle of this mixture for your final topping.
  3. With your large amount of cinnamon sugar, add in your flour and salt.
  4.  Roll out your pastry and push it evenly in the pie pan. Make sure to have a thick enough coating on all sides to ensure you have no holes in your pie and allow some to extend over the side of your pie dish.
  5.  Coat the bottom of your pastry with your sugary flour mixture._MG_4841
  6.  Peel and cut your apples. Some don’t like to peel apples, but I’d prefer a soft apple pie rather than a chewy one with all those apple skins still intact. Layer your chopped apples to the top of your pie crust. Then sprinkle the remaining flour cinnamon sugar mix on top of your apples._MG_4843_MG_4844
  7. You can do this step as you like, but for a lattice top – cut strips out of your remaining pastry and cross them across the top of your pie. Connect the edges of the dough from the excess bottom to the top lattice to create the finished pie. If you decide to use one solid piece of pastry, make sure to cut a slit in the top to allow your pie to breathe._MG_4846
  8. Whisk together the egg and a bit of water in a separate bowl. Use a brush or back of a spoon to get that egg mixture across the top of your pie and sprinkle on that extra cinnamon sugar you saved.
  9. Bake for 30 minutes or until the top is golden brown.
  10. Remove, let cool and eat.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>